Our Perspective

      • World must come together to reframe development | Anne-Isabelle Degryse-Blateau

        12 Jun 2012

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        SCHOOLGIRL IN ADDIS-ABABA, ETHIOPIA. KOREA IS INCREASING ITS OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE. PHOTO: UN PHOTO ESKINDER DEBEBE

        The rise of Asia, economic challenges in the West, the increasing importance of foundations and the private sector in development mean global development partnerships must be broader than ever before.  It must also reflect the aspirations of the poor and marginalized, who are demanding to be heard. At the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan, Republic of Korea, in 2011, the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) and emerging countries, traditional donors, developing nations, the private sector, civil society and other groups came together to endorse a new Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation. The broad consensus reached at Busan lights the way for the world to work together in reframing development after the Millennium Development Goals expire in 2015. Consultations on a new development framework are underway. The United Nations is leading a comprehensive process within countries and regions on global themes to help build consensus. This is why 13 Asian nations are sharing views on what should come next . Their recommendations should feed into the post-2015 consultation process, which is as important as the end result.  If all actors do not buy in, the new framework will not work. The Republic of KoreaRead More

      • Road to Rio: People's voluntary involvement is key | Flavia Pansieri

        04 Jun 2012

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        One of the local volunteers participating in the UNV Sudan supported Diversity campaign in Khartoum, Sudan. Photo: Ayman Suliman

        Volunteering is a key driver of the changes needed in our societies to achieve sustainable development. If we - each one of us - don't engage, participate and be the change we seek, how can we expect to build a sustainable future for generations to come? Every single person is acting for sustainable development, by helping friends and family, by recycling waste, by teaching the kids how to turn off the tap. Most people engage voluntarily without even thinking about it, just because they know it is the right thing to do. Some people volunteer further, and get involved in development or environmental action for a week, for a month, for a year. Their work, big or small, might sometimes go unnoticed to the world. But their actions count in the communities that benefit from their hard work. That is where the power of volunteering comes in. Recent comparative international studies give an idea of the scope of volunteerism. For example, the Gallup World Poll (GWP) concludes that 16 per cent of adults worldwide volunteer for an organization. The Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project (CNP) finds that the number of volunteers contributing through voluntary organizations in 36 countries, taken together,Read More

      • Sharing development experience between Latin America and Africa | Helen Clark

        29 May 2012

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        Cash transfer programmes – such as Brazil’s Bolsa Familia – target low-income households, help reduce poverty levels, and increase access to education and health services.

        More than 40 social development ministers from Latin America and the Caribbean and Africa are gathering this week in Brasilia to discuss how both regions can exchange experiences and increase co-operation to end poverty. The UN Development Programme (UNDP) is proud to be the facilitator of this historic gathering. It takes place less than a month before the Rio +20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development.  There, world leaders, along with thousands of participants from governments, the private sector, and civil society organisations will gather to discuss how to build a more sustainable future—a crucial challenge for developing and developed countries alike.   It is clear that countries can no longer afford to grow first and try to clean up later. Or grow first and try to become more equitable later.  Growth divorced from advances in human development and without regard for the environment will not sustain advances in human development, and will damage the ecosystems on which life on our planet depends.   Two weeks ago, UNDP’s Africa Human Development Report on food security was launched in Nairobi with the President of Kenya.  Despite sub-Saharan Africa’s significant rates of economic growth, hunger continues to affect nearly a quarter of its populationRead More

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